Complete Profile & Information About Seventh day Adventist.

 

As of May 2007, it was the twelfth-largest religious body in the world, and the sixth-largest highly international religious body. It is ethnically and culturally diverse, and maintains a missionary presence in over 215 countries and territories.

 

The Seventh-day Adventist Church is a Protestant Christian denomination which is distinguished by its observance of Saturday, the seventh day of the week in Christian and Jewish calendars, as the Sabbath, and its emphasis on the imminent Second Coming (advent) of Jesus Christ.

The denomination grew out of the Millerite movement in the United States during the mid-19th century and it was formally established in 1863.

The world church is governed by a General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, with smaller regions administered by divisions, union conferences, and local conferences.

As of May 2007, it was the twelfth-largest religious body in the world, and the sixth-largest highly international religious body. It is ethnically and culturally diverse, and maintains a missionary presence in over 215 countries and territories.

 

  • DATE OF ESTABLISHMENT: Seventh day Adventist was established on the 21st of May 1863
  • Christ Embassy Member statistics: the church has over 21 million members.
  • LOCATION/HEADQUARTERS: Silver Spring, Maryland, United States
  • BRANCHES: the church has over 86,576 churches all over the world
  • FOUNDER: Joseph Bates, James White, Ellen G. White, J. N. Andrews
  • CURRENT LEADER: Ted N. C. Wilson

Seventh day Adventist Church Annual Event Calendar

 

The Seventh-day Adventist Church is the largest of several Adventist groups which arose from the Millerite movement of the 1840s in upstate New York, a phase of the Second Great Awakening. William Miller predicted on the basis of Daniel 8:14–16 and the “day-year principle” that Jesus Christ would return to Earth between the spring of 1843 and the spring of 1844. In the summer of 1844, Millerites came to believe that Jesus would return on October 22, 1844, understood to be the biblical Day of Atonement for that year. Miller’s failed prediction became known as the “Great Disappointment”.

Spread the love